Dentist in Syracuse, NY
Dr. Karen Lawitts and Dr. Nancy Yeates

100 Intrepid Lane
Syracuse, NY 13205

(315) 492-8138
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(315) 492-8138

100 Intrepid Lane
Syracuse, NY 13205

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Posts for: December, 2013

By Drs Lawitts and Yeates
December 23, 2013
Category: Oral Health
HowtoHelpYourselfAvoidStainedTeeth

There are many ways to brighten and whiten teeth if they become dull and stained; but if you know the causes of staining on teeth, you may be able to avoid it in the first place. Here are some of the main causes of stained teeth. We hope this will help keep your smile stain-free.

Extrinsic Staining

  1. What we call extrinsic staining occurs when stain-producing substances collect on the enamel surface of your teeth. To stop or slow this process, cut down on consumption of coffee, red wine, and tea, which contains high tannin contents.
  2. Cut down on smoking. Tobacco can stain teeth, so it's best to stop the use of tobacco in any form.
  3. Some mouthwashes and toothpastes contain substances that can cause tooth staining. Mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine, a prescription antibacterial mouthrinse, or those containing cetylpyridium chloride, can cause dental staining after long-term use. Some toothpastes contain stannous fluoride, which can also induce brown discoloration.
  4. Dry mouth, a common problem, may contribute to extrinsic discoloration. This problem is sometimes a side effect of medications you are taking and drinking more water can often alleviate it. If drugs are the cause of mouth dryness, a consultation with your physician should be considered.
  5. Bacterial buildup by chromogenic (color or stain producing) bacteria in your mouth can cause staining. Hundreds of bacteria normally live in your mouth, and it is important to keep good regular dental hygiene habits to prevent bacteria from accumulating on your teeth and gums.

Intrinsic Staining

  1. Stains that are caused by various organic compounds that build up within the mineral matrix of your tooth's enamel are called intrinsic stains. They may be caused by tooth decay within the tooth or between the tooth and dental filling materials. Tooth decay is brown, it not only discolors teeth, but it also destroys tooth structure.
  2. Use of some medications, such as tetracycline antibiotics, can cause intrinsic staining.

Make an appointment for an examination and assessment of your teeth, so that we can determine why they are developing stains. Once we know the cause, we can draw up a plan for whitening and brightening your teeth.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth staining and its treatments. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Staining.”


By Drs Lawitts and Yeates
December 20, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: loose teeth  
TreatmentforLooseTeeth

There is nothing pleasant about having a loose tooth. It can be very unsettling to feel your tooth move around, and you may be worried about losing the tooth entirely. If you notice any looseness in your teeth, you should make an appointment with our office immediately, so that we can determine the underlying cause.

There are two reasons for loose teeth, and most often, this looseness is actually a late symptom of gum (periodontal) disease. If left untreated, this disease destroys the supporting structure of your teeth, including the bone. As bone loss progresses, teeth gradually become looser, and if you do not seek treatment, this can ultimately result in tooth loss.

Another less common reason for loose teeth is excessive biting forces, including clenching or grinding of the teeth. These biting forces are outside the normal range of functional pressures and can stretch the periodontal ligaments that join the teeth to the supporting bone, resulting in loose teeth.

In both cases, this condition can be classified as “occlusal (bite) trauma.” When we examine you, we will determine the type of occlusal trauma that you have.

  • If the amount of bone supporting your teeth is normal and excessive force is causing your loose teeth, it then is referred to as primary occlusal trauma. Our treatment approach will focus on reducing the biting forces. We may recommend minor bite adjustments and/or custom mouthguards.
  • Secondary occlusal trauma occurs when gum disease has caused excessive bone loss. In this instance, even normal biting forces can be damaging. We will work with you to treat the gum disease and improve your oral hygiene efficiency to heal your gums. Once the gum tissue heals and the inflammation is reduced, it is likely that there will be some tightening of the teeth. We will then adjust the biting surfaces of your teeth. This is accomplished by carefully reshaping (by drilling) small amounts of your tooth's surface enamel to change the way upper and lower teeth contact each other, thus redirecting forces. Secondary occlusal trauma may also require splinting or joining teeth together, so that they can handle biting pressures. The need for this additional procedure will be determined by your response to treatment and how much mobility of the teeth remains after the inflammation is resolved.

If you would like more information about loose teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Loose Teeth: Biting Forces Can Loosen Teeth.”


By Drs Lawitts and Yeates
December 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures   Syracuse  
Dentures Syracuse NYWhen it comes to your teeth—even your false teeth with dentures—it is important to take proper care of them.  Whether you have your natural teeth or are sporting dentures in Syracuse, Dr. Karen Lawitts and Dr. Nancy Yeates are available to offer some helpful tips for ensuring your dentures in Syracuse remain in tip-top shape.
 

Tips for Patients in Syracuse with Dentures:

 
If you have dentures, Dr. Lawitts and Dr. Yeates offer several tips for helping you care for your dentures.
 
Each Individual Patient is Different. Everyone is different.  And that is the same for your dentures in Syracuse. While some people may tell you they never had to go through any adjustments—that is not the norm. Everyone adjusts to new dentures differently.  So, if you require adjustments, don’t worry.
 
Soreness. When you first begin wearing your dentures, you might experience soreness.  These areas develop, as your gums are getting used to the new dentures.  Remember, though, not to adjust your dentures yourself—they will settle on the soft tissues on their own. 
 
Chewing. Learning to chew with your new dentures in Syracuse may not come easy, as it can take up to 8 weeks to full adjust.  However, practice makes perfect.  Try to first limit your diet to sift foods that are easy to chew.  Once you grow accustomed to this, you can gradually move on to other foods by taking small bites and chewing slowly.
 
Speaking. Just like chewing, speaking with your dentures will take practice and perseverance, as well.  Reading aloud is very helpful in learning to pronounce words distinctly.  Try practicing words and sounds that seem to give you the most difficulty.
 
Oral hygiene.  Cleaning your dentures daily is vital to maintaining your oral health.  Talk to Dr. Lawitts and Dr. Yeates, our dentists in Syracuse, NY, for further instructions on proper cleaning methods to maintain optimal oral hygiene.

By Drs Lawitts and Yeates
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: cracked mouth  
TreatingandPreventingCrackedMouthCorners

You may be suffering from an uncomfortable cracking of the skin at the corners of the mouth. This condition is known as perleche (or angular cheilitis). From the French word “lecher” (“to lick”), it derives its name from the tendency of sufferers to lick the affected areas.

There are a number of causes for perleche. It’s found most often in children who drool during sleep, or in teenagers or young adults wearing braces. Older adults develop perleche due to the wrinkling of skin caused by aging; and anyone can develop the condition from environmental factors like cold, dry weather. Conditions from within the mouth may also be a cause: inadequate saliva flow; inflammation caused by dentures; or tooth loss that diminishes facial support and puts pressure on the skin at the corners of the mouth. Systemic conditions such as anemia, diabetes or cancer can dry out oral tissues and membranes, which may lead to perleche.

Our first priority is to treat any underlying infection. Cracked mouth corners are easily infected, most commonly from yeast called candida albicans. The infection may range from minor discomfort localized in the affected area to painful infections that involve the entire mouth and possibly the throat. Any of these can be treated with an oral or topical anti-fungal medication, including anti-fungal ointments applied directly to the corners of the mouth until the infection clears up. Chlorhexidine mouth rinses can also be used to treat minor yeast infections.

As for healing the cracked skin, a steroid ointment for control of inflammation combined with a zinc oxide paste or ointment will serve as an antifungal barrier while the tissues heal. If the condition is related to missing teeth or dentures, we can take steps to replace those teeth or ensure the dentures are fitting properly. Good oral health also goes a long way in preventing further reoccurrence of perleche, as well as dermatological techniques to remove deep wrinkles due to aging.

If you would like more information on perleche and other mouth sore issues, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cracked Corners of the Mouth.”


By Drs Lawitts and Yeates
December 04, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TestYourKnowledgeAboutThumbSuckinginChildren

Are the following statements true or false?

Thumb sucking in children may cause problems with their teeth later on.

A: TRUE

Prolonged thumb sucking may be responsible for many problems with the bite. The constant pressure of the thumb itself can create a gap between the top and bottom teeth in front, a condition called an “open bite.” It also reinforces the habit of using the “tongue thrust” motion in swallowing, where the tongue is positioned between top and bottom teeth. This habit may also block full eruption of the front teeth.

Infants and young children swallow exactly the same way that adults do.

A: FALSE

When they swallow, young children use what is called the “infantile swallowing pattern.” In this method, which begins before their teeth have erupted, the tongue is thrust forward in the mouth, sealing and supporting the lips. In adult swallowing, the tongue touches the roof of the mouth, behind the front teeth. The transition from the infantile method usually happens naturally, by around age 4.

Most open bites result from the habit of positioning the tongue too far forward.

A: TRUE

Failure to transition between the infantile and adult swallowing pattern is believed to be the cause of most open bites. The tongue's position alone may prevent the front teeth from fully developing. Allowing the thumb to rest between the teeth has the same effect — and it can also push the front teeth forward. Other causes of an open bite are skeletal or jaw-related problems.

It is harder to cure open bites caused by thumb sucking or bad tongue position than those from other causes.

A: FALSE

Open bites that are caused by skeletal factors (patterns of bone growth, etc) are often difficult to resolve. Those caused by dental factors (tongue position, tooth eruption, etc) are generally easier to fix. However, the pressure exerted by the thumb over a long period of time can influence bone growth in the jaw.

There is a dental appliance that can help discourage thumb sucking.

A: TRUE

A thin metal “tongue crib” placed behind upper and lower incisors discourages the thumb-sucking habit. It also helps to “re-train” the tongue, keeping it from going between upper and lower teeth. To successfully treat an open bite caused by dental factors, and to prevent its reoccurrence, it is essential to eliminate the unhelpful habits of both the thumb and the tongue.

If you would like more information about thumb sucking or open-bite problems in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Thumb Sucking Affects The Bite.”




Dr. Karen Lawitts

Dr. Karen Lawitts

Dr. Nancy Yeates

Dr. Nancy Yeates

Dr. Lawitts was born and raised in Syracuse, NY. She received her Bachelor of Science and D.D.S degree from Northwestern University in Chicago. Dr. Nancy Yeates graduated from Canisius College with a B.A. in Biology. She then attended Georgetown University School of Dentistry.
       
Read more about Dr. Karen Lawitts and Dr. Nancy Yeates

 

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